Hard-Working Dogs Seeking Loving Retirement Homes

Dogs fill important positions in law enforcement, military operations and public security. What happens to these specialized canines when their time in service is over? Some have the opportunity to live with their handlers, but many of these animals need people like you to provide them with loving homes and happy retirements. The Transportation Security Administration has several canine workers ready for eligible families.

ABOUT THE DOGS
Trained canines are used to sniff out bombs in airports throughout the nation. The TSA finds suitable families for retired dogs, as well as animals who don’t make it through training school. German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, Belgian malinois and German short-haired pointers are the most common breeds available. The animals are typically between the ages of 2 and 10 years old.

THINGS TO CONSIDER
Retired working dogs don’t always make the perfect family pet. These animals are generally housed in kennels and must adapt to indoor living. Bomb-sniffing dogs tend to be extremely active and usually need plenty of opportunities for play and exercise. Most retired working dogs are best suited for families who do not have children under 5, according to the adoption guidelines at Lackland Air Force Base.

HOW TO ADOPT
The Military Working Dog School at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, maintains a waiting list of families interested in adopting canine retirees. The organization places about six injured or retired dogs with new families each month. Some agencies, such as the Transportation Security Administration, announce periodic adoption campaigns. An individual must complete an application process to adopt a working dog and must travel to San Antonio to pick up his new friend. There’s no charge for the adoption. Retired working dogs find families to love and care for them every day, but there are hundreds of dogs sitting in local animal shelters who may never feel that satisfaction. Find out what you can do to give dogs like this a second chance.

Souce Story: blog.theanimalrescuesite.com

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